The Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, California, home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra

Lillian Disney donates $50 million

In 1987, the former Disney pen and ink artist, the very wealthy and generous Lillian Disney, widow of the world-famous Walt Disney, donates $50 million of her fortune to begin construction of the philharmonic hall in Los Angeles. $50 million in today's money would be around $108 million. A lot of money.

One of Lillian's many claims to fame is the name 'Micky Mouse', Lilian saved the world from the rather depressing and dreary sounding, 'Mortimer Mouse' that her husband, Walt had suggested as his preferred name for perhaps the world's most famous cartoon character.

Lillian and Walt were married for 41 years. Lillian died on 16th December 1997, 31 years later than her husband, aged 98 after suffering a stroke the day before.

The plan for the concert hall was to put Los Angeles at the centre of the cultural sphere on the world stage. Music, which was and is so extremely important to the Disney business, as an art form, was to be honoured very highly with its very own fairy tale castle.

To this day The Disney Concert Hall is the permanent home of the brilliant Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, LA, California. The main auditorium holds 2265 concert-goers and boasts exceptional acoustics. Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

The Walt Disney Concert Hall, LA, California. The main auditorium holds 2265 concert-goers and boasts exceptional acoustics.

Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

Frank Gehry

The architect of the moment was Frank Gehry, but it was no slam-dunk for Mr Gehry. An international competition was held and more that 70 alternative designs were submitted. I have searched for these alternative designs without success.

Gehry imposed his characteristic free form, flowing, sharp edged style on the building and the design team. To me the building represents music made solid. It flows like music; it looks like sound exploding out of the sidewalk like a symphony.

Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, showing the dramatic structure in contrast to the sidewalk. Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

Frank Gehry’s Walt Disney Concert Hall, showing the dramatic structure in contrast to the sidewalk.

Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

This flowing style, which has made Gehry a household name (well in architect’s houses at least) can be seen in all of his buildings.

The design for the Concert Hall

The design for the Disney concert hall was done years before his signature design for the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao. The hall was subject to over 10 years of delay and took 16 years to complete, opening on 24th October 2003. This allowed Mr Gehry to hone his design.

On first sight it looks like a set of silver sails heading towards you from Bunker hill. The sails appear to be billowing and full of wind.

The conceptual design originally called for a stone clad building. However, after receiving much critical acclaim for his ground breaking, stunning titanium-clad Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Gehry decided to change the stone cladding he had in mind to a 3D stainless steel panel system. Utilizing 3D stainless steel panels, which were designed to be used instead of titanium panels enabled a high gloss finish on the building, rather than the more muted tones of titanium. The stainless steel panels enabled Gehry to develop the design and hone the edges.

The sweeping entrance to the Walt Disney Concert Hall

The sweeping entrance to the Walt Disney Concert Hall

Photo by www.atmtxphoto.com/Blog/Creative-commons

The stainless steel "sails"

This gloss finish has brought its own problems to the design. The surface of the stainless steel panels reflects light and thus heat onto the side walk, making the area uncomfortable for road-users and pedestrians alike. This unusual problem has been partly addressed by metalwork contractors sandblasting the worst affected areas with a fine grit.

The Disney Concert Hall is thought by many to be the first Architectural/Engineering/Construction project in the United States where 100% of all the construction drawings and dimensional controls are defined fully in a three-dimensional computer model. These architectural, structural, mechanical, and construction models consist mainly of very complex curves and complex surfaces.

These early 3D models were generated by a revolutionary computer system, utilising an early 3D modelling system called CATIA CAD/AM on a network of Unix workstations. CATIA was used to produce 3 Dimensional models for Aerospace and the Automobile industry and was very cutting-edge technology.

The stainless steel “sails” of the Walt Disney Concert Hall. Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

The stainless steel “sails” of the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

Photography by TIDB (The UK Interior Design Bureau) 2016.

By Richard Storer-Adam
Managing Director of Double Stone Steel Ltd.

Here we look at every kind of architecture, often including steel and other metals of course, current and historical usually by famous and influential architects but sometimes by names that are surprisingly lesser known.

The Castelar Building, Madrid, Spain – a glass lantern floating above the Paseo de la Castellana - Double Stone Steel

The Castelar Building, Madrid, Spain – a glass lantern floating above the Paseo de la Castellana

The conviction of Rafael de La-Hoz Arderius and Gerardo Olivares to build a minimalist sculpture of steel, glass and travertine on an urban scale.

The story of how the Petersen Automotive Museum leapt into the 21st century with a futuristic steel exoskeleton design strongly influenced by car culture - Double Stone Steel

The story of how the Petersen Automotive Museum leapt into the 21st century with a futuristic steel exoskeleton design strongly influenced by car culture

Robin Fisher explores this building, located at the gateway of Los Angeles' famous Museum Row, extensively renovated through the work of Kohn Pedersen Fox and A.Zahner.

The US Steel Tower, a lasting beacon on the Pittsburgh skyline and legacy of Andrew Carnegie - Double Stone Steel

The US Steel Tower, a lasting beacon on the Pittsburgh skyline and legacy of Andrew Carnegie

Richard Storer-Adam reviews the design and construction of this 64-story skyscraper, built in the 1970’s with Cor-Ten steel, symbolising the triumph of the US Steel industry.

The design story of the Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York City, built in 1957 - Double Stone Steel

The design story of the Seagram Building, 375 Park Avenue, New York City, built in 1957

Richard Storer-Adam reviews the background and architecture of this iconic modernist glass and bronze tower by German-American architect Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe and American associate architect Philip Cortelyou Johnson.

An examination of the design theory behind Seattle Central Library by OMA - Double Stone Steel

An examination of the design theory behind Seattle Central Library by OMA

Antonio Moll reviews the first work by the Dutch Office in the USA, 16 years after its opening, considering what is probably the most disrupting piece of architecture of the 21st Century.

The Flatiron Building (originally the Fuller Building), designed by Daniel H. Burnham and built in 1902 - Double Stone Steel

The Flatiron Building (originally the Fuller Building), designed by Daniel H. Burnham and built in 1902

Richard Storer-Adam dwells on the genesis of NYC’s most iconic skyscraper and ‘quintessential symbol’ of Manhattan, New York City, New York, USA named after the Flatiron district.

How our use of metals and finishing processes features in design today and since prehistoric times.

The Mini - an iconic car with a design that is recognised around the world. - Double Stone Steel

The Mini - an iconic car with a design that is recognised around the world.

Considered the second most influential car of the 20th Century just after the Ford Model T the Mini is a British Pop-culture icon.

The story of Kem Weber (1889 – 1963), one of the proponents of Art Deco design and architecture in 1930s America - Double Stone Steel

The story of Kem Weber (1889 – 1963), one of the proponents of Art Deco design and architecture in 1930s America

Richard Storer-Adam recounts the work of this influential industrial designer, famous for his work with Walt Disney Studios, through two of his favourite products created in the style of Streamline Moderne.

How the simple industrial process of tube drawing allows for the production of precision quality pipe and tube - Double Stone Steel

How the simple industrial process of tube drawing allows for the production of precision quality pipe and tube

Richard Storer-Adam gives a brief history of two essential modern-day products - hypodermic needles and steel pipes - and the manufacturing technique that connects them.

A brief tutorial on the most luxurious stainless steel watches in the world - Double Stone Steel

A brief tutorial on the most luxurious stainless steel watches in the world

Richard Storer-Adam gives a brief tutorial on Rose and Rose Gold watches, watch straps, lugs and integrated wrist bands including the Rolex Glidelock system in 904L stainless steel.

A virtual tour of Oscar Niemeyer’s Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Niterói, Brazil - Double Stone Steel

A virtual tour of Oscar Niemeyer’s Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Niterói, Brazil

An appreciative and honest critique of this dramatic architectural work - Lola Adeokun shares her experiences and feelings whilst visiting Niemeyer’s museum of art in Rio de Janeiro.

A study of the major design influencer Jean Prouvé - Double Stone Steel

A study of the major design influencer Jean Prouvé

Richard Storer-Adam gives an overview of the life of an iconic mid-century designer whose background as a blacksmith and empathy with metal fabrication played out in his work ranging from furniture, such as the famous Standard SP chair, to pre-fabricated buildings.